Genealogy Research – Calhoun County Alabama

When doing genealogy research on my own family tree I sometimes come across information I feel like others may need to see also. Maybe there is another family out there doing research that hasn’t found these little details that I have stumbled across. This week I found an article in the Jacksonville Republican, a newspaper that was published during the 1800’s in Jacksonville, Alabama.
WH_Jeffers_Obit_Jacksonville_Republican_1890 Jacksonville Republican Newspaper – Jacksonville, Alabama
12 April 1890 – Page 2
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DEATH OF MR. W. H. JEFFERS.
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A Valuable Citizen Has Breathed His Last.

Mr. William Henry Jeffers died at his home on Mulberry street, last night at 7:30 o’clock. He was stricken with paralysis while at work in his office a couple of weeks since and never rallied.
He as born in Hamburg, S. C., on the 8th of September, 1837, and died on the 8th day of April, 1890. During the Confederate war Mr. Jeffers, assisted by Capt. Trenholm, organized the Rutledge Mounted Riflemen and joined Hamptons Legion. He surrendered at the head of the squadron at Appomattox, and witnessed the greeting of Generals Grant and Lee. He was always noted for his coolness and bravery. He was one of South Carolina’s most gallant soldiers and leaders during the war. He was a Southern gentleman of the old school and since 1867 a consistent christian and member of the Baptist church. He came to Anniston in 1874 and at first did business for the Woodstock Iron Company. He as elected clerk and treasurer of the city in 1883 and was holding that responsible position at the time of his death.
He married a daughter of Dr. Jenkins, in Newberry, S. C., in 1868, and was the father of ten children, six of them living.–Anniston Hot Blast

Genealogy Research – Calhoun County Alabama

When doing genealogy research on my own family tree I sometimes come across information I feel like others may need to see also. Maybe there is another family out there doing research that hasn’t found these little details that I have stumbled across. This week I found an article in the Jacksonville Republican, a newspaper that was published during the 1800’s in Jacksonville, Alabama.

The following is a transcript from a letter written by H.L. Whiteside to the editors of the Jacksonville Republican Newspaper. He is writing to send news back to Calhoun County Alabama on their situation in arriving in Texas with his family of eleven and only $94. Mr. Whiteside was a tenant farmer and lived in the Holland Texas area for a very long time.

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Letter from Harvey Lafayette Whiteside (born Nov. 24, 1848 – Alabama) to the Editors of the Jacksonville Republican Newspaper – Jacksonville Alabama Continue reading

Homemade Hard Soap

Homemade Hard Soap Hard Soap (Castile) - Only 3 Ingredients Olive Oil, Water & Lye Cured 1 Year (for hardness) Just like Nanna would have made!

Homemade Hard Soap by Pam

Homemade Hard Soap
Hard Soap (Castile) – Only 3 Ingredients
Olive Oil, Water & Lye
Cured 1 Year (for hardness)
Just like Nanna would have made way back then!

Recreated from researching recipes found in old newspaper clippings, magazines and handwritten recipes found tucked away in old recipe books.

Most times I make and use the soaps myself. This little gift box of soaps was for a silent auction a couple weekends ago. I’ve also dabbled some with other types of soaps. Soaps made from lye are not like the soaps bought in stores. Since these contain lye they have been curing for quite a while. The longer they cure the better they are when used! Have you ever bought homemade soaps that seemed “wet” or “soft”? Those are very young soaps that still contain a lot of water and haven’t quite cured yet. Cured soaps will last longer and not “melt” in the shower. I’m not sure when I’ll make my next batch of soaps but as soon as summer is here watch out! (For safety reasons I make the soaps outside so that the lye fumes don’t accidentally overwhelm!) Who knows, maybe I’ll find a large kettle and start making soap out in the yard over a fire! Just kidding. The neighbors might think I’ve gone crazy.

Garden Stuff – Feed Bag Planters

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The area we live in makes it a little difficult to garden. With all the red dirt and clay our garden has always been some type of raised bed or in planters. This year I’m trying something new with the feed bags that I save when ever I buy chicken feed. I cut a small hole in the bottom and hammered in a tomato stake. The stake goes into the ground about 6 or 8 inches. Then I fill with a garden soil compost mixture. The stake helps support the planter bag and it will also help support the vegetables. We’ll see how this goes…I have about eight more to put together.


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